Courageous Conversations

Courageous Conversations is a series of collaborative discussions within the School of Education regarding race and culture in schools and society. Students, faculty and staff gather to discuss our roles as teachers, counselors, school psychologists, and educational leaders. 

Our aim is twofold:

  1. to provide a safe space to discuss race, culture, diversity, and inclusion both within the School of Education and in the schools, institutions of higher education, agencies, organizations and communities in which we serve and live.
  2. to discuss our roles as educators, counselors, and leaders in making a positive impact in our communities and becoming true allies to our communities of color. 
Nov. 15 at 6:00 pm: The Path Forward for Equity

Help us kick off W&M Education Week with a Courageous Conversation about the future of equity in our educational institutions. As the topic becomes more and more politicized in the media and national discourse, how do we move forward as educators? Courageous Conversations provide a safe space to share your own experiences and perspectives and to learn from fellow educators. 

Register now

Oct. 6 at 6:30 pm: The Violent Dismantling of Education: Processing the attacks on Equity in Educational Insitutions

Over the past year, the rhetoric surrounding race and schools has become increasingly heated and politicized. Join faculty, staff and students from the School of Education for a Courageous Conversation about equity in K-12 and higher education settings. Participants will hear from faculty and have an opportunity to discuss their own experiences and share resources in this safe space. 

May 6 at 7pm: The Overcriminalization of the Black Community: Implications for Education

As we witness incidents of brutality and violence against members of the Black community across the country, join us for a special Courageous Conversation featuring community-based guest panelists to reflect on our roles as educators, colleagues and active citizens in combatting the criminalization of Blackness.

Hosted by Natoya Haskins, Director of Diversity & Inclusion in the School of Education, our panel will include: 

  • Linwood Blizzard, Candidate for House of Delegates, Senior Pastor of the Macedonia Baptist Church in Heathsville, Virginia
  • Deborah Cheesebro, Associate Vice President for Public Safety and Chief of Police, William & Mary
  • Martinis Jackson, Author of Justice My Way: Memoirs of a Black Prosecutor, Founder of Jackson Legal Services PLLC
  • Charles Pierre, Lead Counsel for Data Privacy and Products, Facebook
  • Yohance Whitaker '16, Organizer of the Civil Rights & Racial Justice Program at the Legal Aid Justice Center
April 8: Courageous Conversation

Join us in this safe space to discuss, process and reflect on issues relating to race and education. 

Feb. 16: Democracy, Freedom and Justice in Education

School of Education faculty, staff and students gathered for a Courageous Conversation on the topics of democracy, freedom and justice, examining these concepts through the lens of equity in education. The discussion focused on strategies for navigating divergent perspectives in the classroom and workspace, as well as how to create safe spaces for students and colleagues to share their voices.

Nov. 16: Post-Election Courageous Conversation

Join us for a Courageous Conversation focused on moving forward as educators, colleagues and community members after a tense and divisive election season. Faculty and student moderators will introduce the topic, followed by breakout discussion groups in which participants can connect with fellow members of the community. We’ll explore the implications of the election on individual feelings of belonging and identity — and how we can support one another as we move forward together.

Oct. 20: Race and Equity during an Election Year

Join us for a discussion about race, equity and education in an election year. As the country experiences a tense election season, how we can work to address racist policies in our workplaces, schools and communities? Faculty and student panelists will introduce the topic, followed by breakout discussion groups where all voices can be heard.

Sept. 1: Courageous Conversation: Jacob Blake

As students across the country head back to school, the nation is grappling with yet another police shooting of a Black man. We invite the School of Education community to gather together to discuss the shooting of Jacob Blake and ensuing events in Kenosha, Wisconsin. In this interactive session, participants will discuss their own reactions to these events in small groups and share ideas about how we can move forward as educators. We’ll also discuss how to recognize trauma — particularly among students engaging in virtual environments — and share resources for responding.

July 8: Student Forum

This conversation was intended for students and was led by a panel of student moderators. Students brought questions and thoughts to this safe space, working to incorporate social justice and anti-racist practices in our individual, community and professional lives. Moderators included Paige Goodloe, Aiesha Lee, Shené Owens, and Unity Walker. 

June 18: Where do we go from here?

School of Education faculty, staff and students gathered for our second Courageous Conversation about race, equity and education following the police killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Rayshard Brooks and others. The discussion focused on how we can sustain the momentum gained and continue social justice and anti-racist work in our individual, community and professional lives.

Our panelists included faculty members Dr. Natoya Haskins, Dr. Janise Parker, Dr. Leandra Parris, and Dr. Katherine Barko-Alva, joined by Ph.D. students Aiesha Lee and Unity Walker.

June 4: A courageous conversation

School of Education students gathered to discuss how we move forward as scholars and educators in the current climate. The conversation focused on support resources for students of color, the role of allyship, and actionable steps we can all take to support one another and create an inclusive culture characterized by equity and open dialogue.

Dr. Natoya Haskins, Dr. Janise Parker, Dr. Leandra Parris, Dr. Katherine Barko-Alva, and Dr. Kim Lee Hughes, president-elect of the Association of Multicultural Counseling and Development, facilitated this courageous conversation.