Diversity Lecture Series

The School of Education Diversity Lecture Series brings two to three distinguished educators from across the country to share their research and work promoting inclusiveness and equity of opportunities for students and communities.

Please note the Spring 2020 lecture by Naomi Snider, author of Why Does Patriarchy Persist, was canceled due to the pandemic. 

Fall 2019: Hornsby Distinguished Lecture

Dr. Alfred W. Tatum

Equally Probable: Examining the Long-Term Impacts of Literacy Development For Our Nation’s Youth
Low levels of literacy development are leading to ethnic and gender erasure within major social and scientific disciplines. This is occurring, in large part, because of literacy authorizations occurring within schools across the national landscape. In this lecture, I will discuss the need for advanced levels of literacy development as a way to promote social and scientific consciousness. This lecture will be grounded in my research and experiences with African American males in Chicago’s schools and juvenile detention centers. Implications for our nation’s youth, both high-academically and low-academically performing, will be provided. 

Dr. Alfred W. Tatum is a Professor and Dean of the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. A leading authority and one of the nation's prominent educational scholars of African American boys' literacy development.

About the Hornsby Distinguished Lecture Series

This lecture is supported through a generous endowment established by the late Robert Stanley Hornsby ’41, J.D. ’49 and Mrs. Lois Saunier Hornsby with the purpose of enriching a sense of unity for those engaged in the wonders of teaching and learning.

Watch the lecture:

{{youtube:medium|I5xlOcDN2qg, Dr. Alfred Tatum delivers the 2019 Hornsby Lecture}}

Cheryl Holcomb McCoySpring 2019: Cheryl Holcomb-McCoy

Dr. Cheryl Holcomb-McCoy, dean of the American University School of Education, presented "The Five Simple Truths about Cultural Competence in Education and Counseling" as the invited speaker in the final lecture of the School of Education's 2018-2019 Diversity Lecture Series.

Cheryl Holcomb-McCoy serves as dean at the American University School of Education. Her extensive career in higher education includes academic positions at Johns Hopkins University, University of Maryland College Park, and Brooklyn College of the City University of New York. At Johns Hopkins University, she was the vice provost of faculty affairs and vice dean of academic affairs. In addition to previously having been a department chair at Johns Hopkins University, she was also a professor at both University of Maryland at College Park and Brooklyn College of the City University of New York. Holcomb-McCoy began her career as an elementary school teacher and later became an elementary school counselor. Holcomb-McCoy’s numerous publications highlights her expertise in all areas of the field of education including K-12, leadership and counseling.

Watch the lecture:

{{youtube:medium|lWRpN2AXdpk, Dr. Cheryl Holcomb-McCoy delivers the 2019 Diversity Lecture}}

Previous Lectures

Fall 2018 Hauben Distinguished Lecture: Deborah Loewenberg Ball, professor and former dean of the University of Michigan School of Education, presented "(How) Can Teaching Disrupt Racism and Oppression?" This lecture is supported through a generous endowed gift established by Margaret Divens Hauben '59 and her husband, the late Lawrence A. Hauben with the purpose of supporting the School of Education in its efforts to bring renowned scholars to William & Mary.

Fall 2018: Katherine A. Rowe, president of William & Mary, presented the first diversity lecture of the year, focusing on women's leadership and her new role as the first woman president of William & Mary.

Spring 2018 Hornsby Distinguished Lecture: Freeman Hrabowski, president of The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), presented about expanding underrepresented minority participation in science and technology. This lecture is supported through a generous endowment established by the late Robert Stanley Hornsby ’41, J.D. ’49 and Mrs. Lois Saunier Hornsby with the purpose of enriching a sense of unity for those engaged in the wonders of teaching and learning.

Fall 2017: Cirecie West-Olatunji, associate professor at Xavier University of Louisiana and director of the Center for Traumatic Stress Research, presented "Revisiting the Promise of Multiculturalism in Education."

Fall 2017: Jerlando Jackson, Vilas Distinguished Professor and Department Chair of Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, presented "Diversity Prism Imperative."